Autism Privilege

Why not? Everyone seems to be tacking the word “privilege” onto descriptors. I have “white privilege” because of the color of my skin. I have “economic privilege” because I have a roof over my head and food on the table. The one common thread is I was “given” these labels by people who were different from me.

So, Autism privilege. The current discussions in the communities I frequent are of two minds. First, there are Autistics. All kinds of Autistics from across the spectrum. Autistics writing and speaking up. We’re just spilling out of neat little boxes where others put us.

The second kind are usually parents. They have kids on the spectrum, but are not themselves Autistic. You might see them referred to as “Autism parents,” usually by their social group. Some of these parents are pretty convinced that their child’s Autism is what entitles them to Autism privilege. A name which they gladly accept for all their sacrifices.

See the difference? Autistics speaking for themselves in any fashion are a threat to deep-rooted beliefs. But “sacrificing” yourself by raising your child gives you privilege. Seems a bit backward to me. Why would I choose to listen to those who claim privilege over those that are Autistics? Well, I don’t.

Autism $peaks seeks to drown out Autistic voices. They are claiming privilege on the basis that Autistics are lesser beings that require handholding. And the public buys it because obviously A$ ¬†knows a lot about Autism. That’s the voice of privilege. Not experience.

Listen to the voices. Hear that Autistics feel marginalized by organizations and people who survive by claiming a privilege that is not theirs to claim. Change your perspective and you just might change someone’s world.